In line with our objective of achieving a more sustainable environment, we've written a position paper that helps provide insight into how to achieve this by using different types of bioplastics.

FEAD has shed some clarity on how to make a clear distinction between bio-based, biodegradable and compostable plastics, recognising that some bio-based plastics are not compostable, and some compostable plastics are not bio-based.

To learn more, consult our position paper.

FEAD joins the Circular Plastics Alliance & yet highlights the importance of a stronger policy to significantly improve plastic waste recycling and reincorporation of recycled polymers into new products

 In the pursuit of a stronger commitment towards concrete measures, FEAD nevertheless signs the Circular Plastics Alliance’s Declaration which aims to ensure that 10 million tonnes of recycled plastics a year will be used to make products in Europe by 2025.

According to Jean-Marc Boursier, FEAD’s President: “Such instruments are able to deliver strong market signals, as demonstrated by the adoption of mandatory recycled content in plastic bottles in the recently adopted SUP Directive, even if the latter has not even come into force yet! At a time where exports of sorted materials are questioned, a shock on demand in Europe is still needed for all plastic waste streams to ensure a high collection and plastic recycling rate.”

Continued here

 

Successful reinforcement of the requirements found in Annex II of the Packaging and Packaging Waste Directive should be enacted with the objective of improving design for re-use, promoting high quality recycling, as well as strengthening enforcement in the aforementioned areas.

To this end, FEAD Members have prepared a list of main criteria concerning Annex II of the Packaging and Packaging Waste Directive to be taken into account in revision of the essential requirements for packaging. These criteria have been subdivided into distinct sections composed of: (1) Product Design, (2) Market Issues, and (3) Issues with Current Technology.

Read our list of main criteria here

Following the adoption of the Norwegian proposal on the 10th of May 2019 to amend the Basel Convention by the Conference of Parties, FEAD concurs with the European Council’s position from 15th April 2019 concerning the outcome of the COP 14, and its potential incorporation into the legal framework.

FEAD supports maintaining the current proceedings for the shipment of non-hazardous plastic wastes, including mixtures of non-hazardous plastic wastes within the EU, EEA and OECD.

Member States of the European Union should therefore refrain from an incorporation of the changes made to the Basel Convention into the OECD Decision.

A restriction to the free movement of plastic waste would be an impediment to their effective recovery and recycling.

Please read our position paper for further details on this important issue.

EN 643 is the European List of Standard Grades of Paper and Board for Recycling and was revised in 2014. FEAD, CEPI and EuRIC have published a joint statement on the possible new revision of EN 643 and a possible approach.

At the moment, paper that has been in contact with food is in the prohibited materials section which means that foodstuffs are prohibited in recyclable paper. However, today's technology allows us to handle paper with traces of food and a "little tolerance" of foodstuffs should be allowed.

Therefore, instead of a formal EN 643 revision, we call on CEN to develop an approach to interpret the “zero tolerance” of “organic waste including foodstuffs” in the prohibited materials section by considering a low tolerance level for certain grades. For those, it is important to note that “zero tolerance”, or absolute zero for foodstuffs, does not exist, as a consequence the recycling industry needs a detection threshold for foodstuffs.

For futher details, please consult our position paper here.